ADVISORY- The Long Game: Why the 1957 Civil Rights Act Still Matters Today

Categories: Civil Rights Enforcement, Press Releases

For Immediate Release
Contact: Shin Inouye, 202.869.0398, inouye@civilrights.org

WASHINGTON – On Wednesday, September 13 at 5:00 p.m. ET, The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and the UDC David A. Clarke School of Law will co-sponsor an afternoon panel discussion to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, which established the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.

The event, titled “The Long Game: Why the 1957 Civil Rights Act Still Matters Today,” will include a discussion on the important role civil rights agencies like the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights have played – and should continue to play – in advancing and protecting civil and human rights. The event will also highlight the challenges to federal enforcement of civil rights laws in a Trump administration; and discuss what is at stake with the nomination of Eric Dreiband to head the Civil Rights Division.

The program will also touch on a key event of the civil rights movement in which nine Black students enrolled at formerly all-White Central High School in Little Rock, AR in September 1957, testing the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, which declared segregation in public schools unconstitutional.

The event will also be live streamed at: https://www.facebook.com/udc.law/.

Media interested in covering this event are requested to RSVP by close of business on Tuesday, September 12 to Inouye@civilrights.org.

WHAT: UDC David A. Clarke School of Law and The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights present The Long Game: Why the 1957 Civil Rights Act Still Matters Today

WHEN: Wednesday, September 13 at 5:00 p.m. ET

WHO:

  • Vanita Gupta, president and CEO, The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights
  • Katherine S. Broderick, dean, UDC David A. Clarke School of Law
  • Wade Henderson, former president and CEO, The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and The Leadership Conference Education Fund
  • Catherine Lhamon, chair, U.S. Commission on Civil Rights
  • Dr. Mary Frances Berry, former chair, US Commission on Civil Rights
  • Karen Narasaki, commissioner, U.S. Commission on Civil Rights
  • Gustavo Velazquez, director, the Urban Institute’s Washington-Area Research Initiative
  • Rashad Robinson, executive director, Color of Change
  • Sharon McGowan, director of strategy, Lambda Legal
  • Eve Hill, partner, Brown, Goldstein & Levy
  • Ashley Allison, senior advisor, The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights

WHERE: UDC David A. Clarke Moot Court Room
4340 Connecticut Avenue NW, 5th Floor
Washington, DC 20008

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