2020 Census

New Resource

Asian Americans Advancing Justice | AAJC and The Leadership Conference Education Fund: Factsheet on the Census, Confidentiality, and Japanese American Incarceration (PDF)

Overview of the 2020 Census and the American Community Survey

The census is required by the U.S. Constitution and getting it right is important to everyone. A fair and accurate census, and the collection of useful, objective data about our nation’s people, housing, economy, and communities generally, is among the most important civil rights issues of our day.

Why the Census Counts (PDF)

The Census and Civil Rights (PDF)

The American Community Survey and Civil Rights (PDF)

Census, Citizenship, and Immigration/Legal Status

Both Republican and Democratic administrations, through the U.S. Department of Justice, have confirmed unequivocally that the Constitution requires a count of all persons living in the United States on Census Day, regardless of citizenship or legal status. Nonetheless, on March 26, 2018, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced that he had directed the Census Bureau to add an untested and unnecessary question to the 2020 Census form, which would ask the citizenship status of every person in America.

Citizenship and Immigration/Legal Status Questions on the 2020 Census: Preventing a Decennial Disaster (PDF)

Adding A New Citizenship Question to the 2020 Census (PDF)

Census and Fair, Equitable Distribution of Funds

Each person counted may directly determine funding levels for a few programs, and will influence funding levels for many others. While we cannot say that each person counted in the census would increase federal program dollars to a state or locality by a certain amount, census results are of utmost importance to distributing federal funding – and doing so equitably and prudently.

Counting For Dollars: The Role of the Decennial Census in the Geographic Distribution of Federal Funds is a new analysis of the use of census-derived data by 300 federal programs.

Census and Hard-to-Count Populations

The census has historically missed certain communities – communities of color, urban and rural low-income households, immigrants, and young children – at disproportionately high rates. Being undercounted deprives these communities of equal political representation and private and public resources.

Webinar: The 2020 Census: Why Ensuring a Fair and Accurate Count Matters

Census Accuracy and the Undercount (PDF)

Mapping Hard-to-Count (HTC) Communities for a Fair and Accurate Census (interactive map)

Hard to Count: Young Children and Their Communities (PDF)

  • View Hard-to-Count State, City, and Congressional District Tables for Children under Age 5 here.

Will You Count? Latinos in the 2020 Census (PDF) 

  • View Hard-to-Count State, City, and Congressional District Tables for Latinos here.

Will You Count? Asian Americans and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPIs) in the 2020 Census (PDF) 

  • View Hard-to-Count State, City, and Congressional District Tables for Asian Americans and NHPIs here.

Will You Count? African Americans in the 2020 Census (PDF)

  • View Hard-to-Count State, City, and Congressional District Tables for African Americans here.

Will You Count? American Indians and Alaska Natives in the 2020 Census (PDF)

  • View Hard-to-Count State, City, and Congressional District Tables for American Indians and Alaska Natives here.

Will You Count? Middle Eastern and North African Americans (MENA) in the 2020 Census (PDF)

Will You Count? People Experiencing Homelessness in the 2020 Census (PDF)

Will You Count? Households with Low Incomes in the 2020 Census (PDF)

Will You Count? Renters in the 2020 Census (PDF)

Reports

Counting Everyone in the Digital Age: The Implications of Technology Use in the 2020 Decennial Census for the Count of Disadvantaged Groups, an initiative of The Leadership Conference Education Fund and the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality, addresses how proposed Internet and automation technologies will affect 2020 Census enumeration for groups at risk of being undercounted. The report also includes actionable recommendations for Congress, the administration, and community leaders.

Administrative Records in the 2020 US Census, a collaboration with the Urban Institute, discusses the Census Bureau’s plan for using administrative records in the 2020 Census, potential implications and concerns expressed by the civil rights and research communities, and recommendations distilled from an expert convening on ways the Census Bureau and the civil rights community can collaborate to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the 2020 Census.

Race and Ethnicity in the 2020 Census: Improving Data to Capture a Multiethnic America, co-branded with Asian Americans Advancing Justice | AAJC and the NALEO Educational Fund, is a comprehensive review of how census race and ethnicity data are used to advance equal opportunity and social justice, whether through statutes, regulations, or case law, and the potential implications of proposed revisions to the 2020 census race and ethnicity questions for continued, effective implementation, monitoring, and enforcement of civil rights protections.

Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) Operation

Congress created the LUCA program in 1994 to facilitate state and local participation in building the all-important address list for each census. LUCA gives tribal, state, and local governments the opportunity to review and update the Census Bureau’s address list and digital maps for their areas, reflecting their knowledge of non-traditional and low visibility housing in their communities. Through LUCA, communities can help ensure that the census counts the residents of all housing units and puts them in the right place.

Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) Program (PDF)

News

Census Jobs Provide Opportunity for Reaching Hard-to-Count Populations

Monday, November 23, 2009

As part of the 2010 population count, the Census Bureau is planning to hire more than one million temporary workers nationwide.  The initiative is intended to ensure that the hardest-to-count populations – including communities of color, children, persons with disabilities, and people who speak a language other than English – are fully counted. Available positions … Read More

Categories: Census, News

Unjust Census Amendment Dropped

Thursday, November 5, 2009

The U.S. Senate blocked a controversial amendment today that would have required the Census Bureau to belatedly add a citizenship question to the 2010 Census questionnaire. In voting for cloture on the Commerce Justice and Science (CJS) FY10 Appropriations bill, a majority of senators effectively stopped the amendment from coming up for a vote. If … Read More

Categories: Census, News

Henderson Condemns Vitter Amendment, Calls for Inclusive Census Count

Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Wade Henderson, president and CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, is calling on the Senate to reject a proposed amendment that would require the Census Bureau to add a question on citizenship and immigration status to the 2010 census form less than six months before the census takes place on April 1. In … Read More

Categories: Census, News